About Robotic Surgery

During a robotic procedure, the surgeon will be working at a console located in your surgical suite.

Sitting at the console, the surgeon has 3-D enhanced visualization of the surgical area, and your surgeon holds highly sensitive controls that will be used to move the instruments that are attached to the robotic system.

What is Robotic Surgery?

Q: What are the benefits of robotic surgery compared with traditional methods of surgery?

A: Some of the major benefits using robotic surgery over traditional approaches have been greater surgical precision, increased range of motion, improved dexterity, enhanced visualization and improved access. Benefits experienced by patients may include a shorter hospital stay, less pain, less risk of infection, less blood loss, fewer transfusions, less scarring, faster recovery and a quicker return on normal daily activities. None of these benefits can be guaranteed, as surgery is necessarily both patient and procedure specific.

Q: Will the robotic surgical equipment make the surgeon unnecessary?

A: The system does not operate on its own. It replicates the surgeon’s hand movements in real time. Robotic surgery enables surgeons to be more precise, advancing their technique and enhancing their capability in performing complex minimally invasive surgery. It cannot be programmed, nor can it make decisions on its own to move in any way, or perform any type of surgical maneuver without the surgeon’s input.

Why robotic-assisted surgery?

Some of the major benefits using a robotic surgical system over traditional approaches have been greater surgical precision, increased range of motion, improved dexterity, enhanced visualization and improved access. Benefits experienced by patients may include a shorter hospital stay, less pain, less risk of infection, less blood loss, fewer transfusions, less scarring, faster recovery and a quicker return on normal daily activities. None of these benefits can be guaranteed, as surgery is necessarily both patient and procedure specific.

Robotic surgeries we offer

  • Colorectal Surgery
  • General Surgery
  • Gynecologic Procedures
    • Endometriosis Resection
    • Hysterectomy
  • Urology Procedure

In the past, surgeons made large incisions in skin and muscle so that they could directly see and work on the area of concern. This is called open surgery. Today doctors still perform open surgery, but can also perform many procedures in the abdomen and on the digestive tract, often called General Surgery, using minimally invasive laparoscopic or robotic-assisted surgery.

Both minimally invasive approaches only require one or a few small incisions that doctors use to insert surgical equipment and a camera for viewing. In laparoscopic surgery, doctors use special long-handled tools to perform surgery while viewing magnified images from the laparoscope (camera) on a video screen.

The colon and rectum are part of the large intestine. For rectal cancer, proctologist surgeons perform low anterior resection to connect the rectum to the colon after removing the cancer. An abdominoperineal resection may also be performed if the rectal cancer is located too close to the anus.

Colon surgery is usually performed through a large open abdominal incision. Laparoscopic surgery is a minimally invasive alternate to open surgery. However, this can be technically challenging because of the extensive dissection required, along with the limitations of traditional laparoscopy. Robotic surgery offers your surgeon another minimally invasive option to combine the best techniques of an open surgery and with enhanced capabilities of laparoscopic surgery.

Endometriosis is a condition in which the tissue that usually lines the inside of the uterus--the endometrium--grows outside of the uterus. Spots of endometriosis called "implants" or "lesions" are usually found in the pelvic area. Endometriosis is usually diagnosed in women between the ages of 25 and 35, but can occur anytime during a woman's reproductive years. For women with symptoms, endometrial implants can cause irregular bleeding, infertility and pain. Mild to severe pain is the most common symptom, which can occur during periods, intercourse and bowel movement. Pain may also be felt in the lower back or abdomen.

Treatment options may include lifestyle changes, medication or surgery. Two surgical options include cutting out all visible implants leaving the female reproductive organs, or a hysterectomy, removing the uterus and possibly other organs. Surgery for endometriosis can be performed using traditional open surgery or minimally invasive surgery (laparoscopy). Robotic surgery offers your surgeon another minimally invasive option using state-of-the-art technology to combine the best techniques of open surgery with enhanced capabilities of laparoscopic surgery.

A hysterectomy is a solution to many uterine conditions, including fibroids, endometriosis, heavy menstrual bleeding, uterine prolapse and certain cancers or pre-cancers. It is the most commonly performed gynecologic surgical procedure and results in the removal of the uterus (a "partial hysterectomy") or sometimes the cervix with the uterus (a "complete hysterectomy").

The robotic hysterectomy is even less invasive than traditional minimally invasive procedures because the instruments used have more flexibility and a better range of motion. The robotic hysterectomy typically only takes a few small incisions versus a large incision for an open procedure.

The Las Vegas Institute for Robotic Surgery is proud to use robotic surgery to treat the most complex urologic case. The minimally invasive urology surgery allows the patient to experience less scarring, pain and quicker recovery time.